Where to Look for Process Server Jobs

Where to Look for Process Server Jobs

If you’re looking for process server jobs, you have a few different options for where to look. Of course, while there are plenty of places you could be an employee doing the work of another company, letting them tell you how much you’ll earn and what kinds of serving orders you can and can’t take, the best option is to look for a way to create your own job by learning the ins and outs of being a process server and finding people who’ve come before you to help you along the way.

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How To Become A Process Server

Process server jobs aren’t all created equally, and because of their nature, it’s notorious that there will be “bad jobs” or bad listings that you need to be wary of—but we’ve got you covered. In this guide, we’ll cover everything that you need to know about being a process server, including how to find not just the right jobs, but the best paying jobs so that you, too, can take control of your future and build your success as a process server.

First, we’ll talk about the role of a process server, and then we’ll discuss how you can get started and tips to help you along the way.

What is the Job of a Process Server?

So, you’ve heard that you can earn good money and that there’s a huge demand to be filled for those who know where to find it, but what is the job of a process server, really?

A process server is responsible for the unfortunate but necessary task of delivering court summonses to parties who are involved in various legal matters. They can also provide document retrieval services and court filing services, depending on their training and expertise. Since many work independently, they get to pick the jobs that they take so long as they are qualified to do the job at hand.

Some process servers work directly for law firms, local, state, or federal courts, or other agencies that employ them as a regular employee. Others choose to start their own business or simply work as an independent contractor so that they can create their own schedules and forge their own path to success in this field.

Process servers have to be very good at research and with technology. After all, the serving of the documents is the last, and simplest part of the job. First, people have to be found and that can be a challenge. Today, people and businesses change their location and contact information more frequently than ever before. It can be nearly impossible to find the people you need to serve. Thus, a lot of online research, interviews, and other efforts will go into the work.

Creative thinking is also helpful, since process servers often have to think outside of the norms to track people down and serve papers accordingly. Most of the parties being served aren’t looking forward to it, and many will even try to duck your efforts.

How Can I Work as a Process Server?

The serving process in the United States has specific laws and guidelines from one state to the next, as well as some codes and regulations that fall under the United States laws related to Due Process of Law.

What does all that lingo mean? It means you have to be trained and experienced to carry out the role of a process server. You can’t just start serving papers tomorrow—there’s a lot to learn. Fortunately, you can start learning tomorrow, or today even, with our helpful process training resources.

Initially, this was a task for law enforcement or dedicated agents of the court. However, this proved to eat up too many resources and so the guidelines for process serving were revised to allow anyone over the age of 18 to become a process server, so long as they are a resident of the state in which they are working.

Some states require that you be licensed or registered to work as a process server. Currently, that’s only required in nine states:

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Of course, other states may have their own training or education requirements to consider—we’ll help you with that along the way, too.

Plus, you can check out our handy eBook for an on-the-go resource for everything you need to know about process serving and how to become a successful (and perhaps even six-figure earning) process server.

Process Server Employment Tips

If you’re considering this line of work and don’t have experience, there are some things that you need to know that even the best training programs might not teach you. Fortunately, you’re learning from people who have been there and done the work already, and that’s why we’ve included these extra tips, which you can also find along with other valuable information in our eBook on how to become a process server.

  • Training: The very first thing that you need to do is to be trained on everything to do with process serving. With our training course, you will learn all about Due Process and your role as a process server. Not only that, though—while most training stops there, we’ll also teach you where and how to find the best jobs, how to generate passive requests, and how to be the one turning down the jobs instead of trying to hunt them down.

 

  • Planning: This is not for those who want a J-O-B. This is for those who have an entrepreneurial mindset and want to take control of their future with a rewarding career that affords the ability to travel, meet lots of interesting people, and be in total control of their success. You’ll need to have a good plan in place. It’ll get easier to flesh out once you’ve completed our course and finished the book, but for now, just think about what you want to do—map out your future like you’re starting a business (because, essentially, you are going into business for yourself).

 

  • Tech and Travel: If you’re going to be successful as a process server in the 21st century, you have to be good with technology and willing to travel. Process servers aren’t desk jockeys. They spend PLENTY of time on the road. Plus, it won’t always be a quick run across town. There are dead ends, wrong leads, changes in plans, and even more time spent waiting on people to be where they’re supposed to be. You’re going to need to be Internet-savvy so that you can research your subjects, good with directions and mobile apps for your delivery attempts, and apps and tools for managing and transferring data, submitting documents, and more.

 

  • Rules and Laws: As mentioned above, process servers have a lot of different regulations to follow in regard to who can be served, how the process serving should be completed, and what deadlines are involved. Process servers follow a strict moral code and code of conduct, and should always be honest about who they are, avoid trespassing or impersonating law enforcement, and avoid touching people’s mail. This isn’t a job for someone who is looking for an “easy income” or for those who can’t adhere to the regulations and codes required of this field.

These are just a few of the biggest points to keep in mind. If you’re going to be the best at your new career as a process server, these insights will help you along the way.

Process Server Salary: It’s Up to You

The great thing about this field is that there’s so much potential to earn for those who are willing to work for it. If you’ve got an entrepreneurial mindset and a can-do attitude, you can set yourself up for success and find yourself easily earning more than you ever have before in your life. The average process server working for a firm or for the state directly will only earn about $30,000-$50,000 per year.

However, if you become a contractor handling process serving on your own, you can take any jobs that you want and even earn as much as $800 per day. (Okay, so that’s more of an exception than a rule, but you can easily earn as much as $75-$100k as a process server if you know what you’re doing and how to do it most effectively.)

Can I Become a Process Server on My Own?

It’s certainly possible for you to go out and find the requirements for your state, register with the right offices, get the right training, and start finding documents that need served. However, that’s going to take a lot of time and research, not to mention the risks of missing something important along the way—it’s best not to go it alone.

Fortunately, you don’t have to. If you’re ready to get started in the lucrative and rewarding field of process serving, just sign up for our course and check out our eBook to learn everything you need to know so that you can start like you’re already an industry expert instead of figuring it all out on your own.

Apply now, let us handle the “hassles”, and enjoy the new road to success as a process server.

Process Server Training Near Me

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